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Senator’s rebuke after ABC Twitter account with 100,000 followers links to hard-core porn account

Liberal senator Cory Bernardi is no fan on the ABC. Photo: Alex EllinghausenWhat’s in a “t”?
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Everything, it seems, when you run a high profile Twitter account with more than 103,000 followers.

And it’s a lesson the ABC opinion website The Drum has had to learn the hard way, after it accidentally linked to a Twitter account promoting hardcore pornography.

The problem began when the @ABCthedrum account began tweeting about the Heart Foundation’s decision to scrap it’s venerable “tick”, which for more than 20 years has been used to help ns choose healthy food to eat.

The problem is, the Heart Foundation account tweets as @heartaust – but the Drum account tweeted: “Finally we jump to the @HeartAus’s decision to say goodbye to the “Tick” after 26 years.”

And @heartaus, it turns out, is not quite the same thing – in fact, the name of the account is “Love Aussie C–k” and features some pictures that are, to put it mildly, not safe for publication.

The @heartaus account last tweeted in October 2012 and has just 50 followers.

To make matters worse, Twitter user Hilman Hambali wrote to The Drum account soon after the mistake was made to point out the error. The ABC’s rogue tweet was deleted on Wednesday morning.

Liberal senator Cory Bernardi, who was himself embarrassed last month after tweeting a quote from an American neo-Nazi charged with child pornography offences and mistakenly attributed the phrase to French philosopher Voltaire, was scathing about the error.

“Of course it is easy to make mistakes on Twitter, which the ABC seems to relish in politicians,” he said.

“But with a budget of a billion dollars, and a staff of thousands, I suspect even the ABC could avoid linking to pornography. For a billion dollars, I think we expect better than that.”

A spokesman for the ABC said the broadcaster had protocols in place for appropriate use of social media and that “it’s an unfortunate mistake and obviously the intent of that social media account was clear”.

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Hunter companies making the defence industry strong: video

GAME PLAN: Ryan Stephenson, managing director for Bohemia Interactive , which creates military training software. Picture: Simone De Peak.THE Hunter was well placed to capitalise on its booming defence industry, Paterson MP Bob Baldwin said.
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Mr Baldwin said the Hunter had “some incredibly talented people”, with many learning their skills through the defence sector.

He named Bohemia Interactive Simulations as a leading innovator.

“They [Bohemia] developed an interactive war game, like a computer game, that militaries all over the world use,” Mr Baldwin said.

The military technology company originally operated above a Nelson Bay fish and chip shop, before moving to the Williamtown Aerospace Centre.

A preview of a Bohemia Interactive game.Regional Development Hunter chief executive Todd Williams named defence as one of the Hunter’s seven competitive advantages.

The organisation was creating a “smart specialisation” strategy, which involved highlighting sectors expected to create the region’s future jobs.

The aim was to pinpoint the Hunter’s most promising strengths and help it remain internationally competitive.

Readers will get the chance to contribute, with a vote on the Newcastle Heraldwebsite on December 16.

Mr Baldwin said the Hunter’s defence sector had “a bright future”.

“Nothing has made me happier than seeing companies like Lockheed Martin and BAE setting up around the airport precinct,” he said.

“It’s good news for our people because it means jobs.”

HunterNet defence project director Ian Dick said major infrastructure upgrades at the Williamtown RAAF base worth more than $1 billion would boost the sector.

“It’s a big industry with a lot of opportunities,” he said.

“Defence wants everything from mowing lawns to supercomputers.”

Bohemia Interactive managing director Ryan Stephenson was overseas and unavailable for comment.

Mr Stephenson told the Herald last year that clients of the company’s military training software included the US Army, UK Ministry of Defence and n Defence Force.

“We take the underlying technology of a computer game and repurpose it to be a training tool — a soldier sitting at a computer doing cognitive or military training,” Mr Stephenson said.

“It’s not like a video game, it is a video game.”

Home of the ‘bronut’: The top 10 bakeries in South China

The Rolling Pin Bakery and Patisserie, Magill. Photo: Joanna Fincham Home Grain Bakery, Aldinga. Photo: Joanna Fincham
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La Madeleine, Norwood. Photo: Joanna Fincham

Boulangerie 113, Goodwood. Photo: Joanna Fincham

Stirling Cellars & Patisserie, Stirling. Photo: Joanna Fincham

Red Door, Croydon. Photo: Joanna Fincham

Elbio Photo: Joanna Fincham

SPONSORED ARTICLERed Door, Croydon

The Adelaide suburb of Croydon in the inner north is home to Queen Street or Elizabeth Street as it’s officially called – it’s a local anomaly.

But however you name it, this long line of shady verandah and heritage shop space is a hip little enclave of great cafes, home ware stores and one Red Door Bakery.

Gareth and Emma Grierson’s passion for amazing pastry and bread is expressed in earthy, rustic baked goods that pop with flavour, freshness, and the goodness of the best ingredients.

You could almost kid yourself that fruit Danish, resplendent in custard and the flakiest of golden pastry, is a health food.

Add amazing coffee and a top notch breakfast, and it’s no wonder the place is teeming on the weekend, with bikes parked mudguard to mudguard at the side of its corner site.

Don’t miss the incredible pies and sausage rolls­; they’re everything this classic should be.

Red Door also has branches in Goodwood, and newly, in the CBD. La Madeleine, Norwood

It’s common wisdom that a proper French croissant is a hard thing to find outside France.

But La Madeleine may prove the exception to the rule.

The charming café bakery on The Strip in fashionable Norwood is seriously Francophile-central, with an exterior decorated with geranium pots and an interior dotted with the marble tables so classic in France.

Given it’s owned and the kitchen directed by French chef Guillaume Blanc, it’s hardly surprising.

But his homage to his homeland is not just window dressing. Blanc trained at the famous LeNotre school in Paris.

Opening daily from 6am, this is a place for rich, aromatic coffee, and the classic plain flaky croissant done just right.

But then it takes it into new territory, such as a raspberry and pistachio filled, version – that might give Blanc’s countrymen the heebie-jeebies. But locals adore them.

The kitchen rolls out a rainbow of finely beautiful pastries and desserts.

But of course, taste is paramount and the finest ingredients see to it that these perfectly formed treats pop in that department.

La Madeleine also does gluten free desserts and treats, baguettes and crepes.

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Phone 0430 300 638 The Rolling Pin Bakery and Patisserie, Magill

South n brothers James and Phillip Donnelly opened Rolling Pin Bakery and Patisserie in Magill in 2013.

The business has been so successful, they’ve opened two more branches.

They’re at the crest of the wave of Adelaide’s young sweets-loving foodies, who have been inspired by South ‘s ready availability of top quality produce to marry it with French culinary tradition.

The Donnellys are both under 25, with Phillip Donnelly only finishing his apprenticeship two weeks before they opened their original shop.

But it was an apprenticeship that included a period in France, when he fell in love with the patisserie concept.  It wasn’t long before Adelaide fell in love with he and his brother’s take on it.

Alongside striving to deliver a high quality coffee offering, The Rolling Pin revels in sweet classics such as a Belgian chocolate brownie and citron tart.

But the Donnellys like to put their spin on things too: a chocolate éclair becomes a Turkish delight éclair, for instance.

A chocolate tart is finished with house-made golden syrup and honeycomb. The citron tart gets a chocolate crust and South n blood orange curd filling.

As for the take home stuff, Adelaide’s dinner party hosts can wow guests with the likes of an “8-inch pistachio crème mousse with stewed cinnamon apple and macaron butter pastry tart.”

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Phone 08 8331 7435 Boulangerie 113, Goodwood

French purists will point out a boulangerie is a different thing from a patisserie, but 113’s sweet side begs to differ.

Hungry hordes come here for the croissants, that range from the simple classic, to the likes of a spectacular green and cocoa-colour-swirled pistachio and dark chocolate version or a pink-spiraled, cranberry and white chocolate one.

The key to Boulangerie 113’s successful baking is real South n butter that produces the light flaky pastry that characterises their products.

There’s a conspicuous love for Nutella here: find Nutella scrolls and “Bronuts” filled with the hazelnut spread, the bronut being a chocolate, hence brown, doughnut.

Even the croissant gets the Nutella treatment. There’s a hazelnut and Nutella version of the signature colour-swirled varieties.

There’s also the classic fruit and custard pastries so loved by the French, filled with juicy South n fruit, and an in-demand range of artisan breads including ciabatta, rye and brioche, the latter lending itself to all kinds of sweet fillings such as apple and cinnamon.

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Phone 08 8373 2482 Stirling Cellars & Patisserie, Stirling

Taking the concept of ‘mixed business’ into stylish territory, the Stirling Cellars & Patisserie in the Adelaide Hills has stunning interior design of blond wood, chunky trestles, white stools, glossy subway tiles, a marble bar and glamorous oversized hurricane lamp pendants.

But there’s plenty of action to go with it at this café and bottle shop which won Best Retail Outlet at the South n AHA awards for 2012.

The attention to detail is echoed in the coffee. The house blend is created specifically for the patisserie by 5 Senses, or aficionados can choose from a specialty range sourced from boutique roasters Proud Mary and Small Batch.

The pastries, all made in house, are high quality classics alongside baguettes and pies. The owners say all is “Made the old-fashioned way – with hands and heart.”

The bottle shop component of this unique space is not to be missed, though. It houses a big range of local, international and Adelaide Hills wines and there’s often a tasting on, hosted by a local winemaker.

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Stirling Cellars & PatisserieClare Rise Bakery, Clare

Seeing a need in Clare for a bakery, former wine industry professionals Chris and Amanda Harris opened Clare Rise Bakery in 2013.

It was a return to his roots for Chris, who trained under a German baker as a very young man.

It was also a return for the 1895 stone property that houses their enterprise; the hand engraved foundation stone reveals it was built by another baker, all those years ago.

Their six-days-a-week offering is a mix of the classic and experimental, using as much local produce as much as they can.

Lucky for them, ‘s only producer of stone milled durum flour, Pangkarra, is nearby in the Clare Valley.

It’s made from 100 per cent durum wheat from the family farm and the stone milling means it retains the whole grain, making it a healthier food with a great taste and texture.

Chris and Amanda combine it with local seasonal fruits including quandongs, figs and rhubarb to produce goods that are not only in demand on their beautiful shop verandah with district views, but also for restaurants and cafes elsewhere.

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Clare Rise BakeryHome Grain Bakery, Aldinga

Baking everything from scratch from local ingredients and using recipes “that would make your grandmother proud”, the Fleurieu Peninsula’s Home Grown Bakery is the product of another young couple’s vision.

Toff and Cara West met at Flinders University and had a dream of owning a café. In 2011, when they spied the historic mid-1800s general store for sale in the beautiful beachside town of Aldinga, they set about renovating it and turning it into a bakery.

That was in 2011, and so successful has it been, they’ve opened another brand at McLaren Flat.

Their bakers make everything fresh daily and do a roaring trade in pies, from an egg and bacon brekkie pie, to a classic minced beef and a tuna mornay version.

House doughnuts lead the pack of classic n sweet treats such as vanilla slices, scones, muffins chocolate eclairs, finger buns, brownies, cheesecakes and croissants.

The Wests also bake proudly handcrafted bread that sees locals going out of their way to pick up a loaf.

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Home Grain BakeryQueen of Tarts, Adelaide

In a street filled with great coffee and café options you probably can’t go past Queen of Tarts on Hutt Street. Yes there’s great coffee but there’s also wonderfully attentive service as well.

More of a café than a straight bakery, Queen of Tarts delivers an exquisite range of savoury and sweet treats ranging from wonderful pies and quiches to delectable lemon tarts and cannoli. A highlight is a baked chocolate tartlet of lip-schmacking goodness.

A quirky interior matched with an eclectic mix of disco and euro-house tunes makes it one café experience you won’t find anywhere else.  What’s more: everything is cooked on-site. Testament to the winning formula is the Queen has been standing now for over 30 years.

Mulots, Hyde Park

Andre Guerinet and wife Annette are a couple of the originals when it comes to Adelaide’s love of all things French at the moment. They’ve been turning out French savoury and sweet treats since 1985 at this rather quaint bakery in Hyde Park.

Yes the coffee is good but it’s the patisseries items are what makes Mulots a must visit. Try French specialties on the savoury side such as the potato and onion filled Pate Berrichon or maybe a French hot dog (flaky pastry with a Vienna Sausage.

On the sweet side of things, order a croquembouche for a family celebration or sit in the café with freshly baked Madeleines, macarons or mango mousse or lime tart over summer. Truly delicious.

Mulots’ also serves a selection of imported French soft drinks for those keen to indulge their inner Francophile to the fullest. And for those wanting to go even further, Andre offers courses throughout the year where he shares some of his knowledge with eager home cooks.

Two venues to sample Elbio Luis Perez’s Latin American inspired pastry creations. The original factory outlet and café have been around for many years but the new Norwood premises in an old Baptist church is proving a real winner. Inside Elbio’s cafe lunch menu creations including empanadas, Sandwiches De Miga, tortillas, choripan, and chivitos are proving super popular.

Interestingly, much of the 145-year-old church has been restored including the pipe organ and the gorgeous interior. Elbio’s passion for n produce is highlighted throughout many of his creations with a nod to his Uruguayan heritage.

The original Newton premises are where all the magic happens in the kitchen with the ovens turning out a daily supply of handmade cakes and biscuits. Beyond Elbio’s own venues, many of the State’s cafes feature Elbio items on their menus.

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Queenoftarts上海龙凤论坛m.auMulots, Hyde Park

Andre Guerinet and wife Annette are a couple of the originals when it comes to Adelaide’s love of all things French at the moment. They’ve been turning out French savoury and sweet treats since 1985 at this rather quaint bakery in Hyde Park.

Yes the coffee is good but it’s the patisseries items are what makes Mulots a must visit. Try French specialties on the savoury side such as the potato and onion filled Pate Berrichon or maybe a French hot dog (flaky pastry with a Vienna Sausage.

On the sweet side of things, order a croquembouche for a family celebration or sit in the café with freshly baked Madeleines, macarons or mango mousse or lime tart over summer. Truly delicious.

Mulots’ also serves a selection of imported French soft drinks for those keen to indulge their inner Francophile to the fullest. And for those wanting to go even further, Andre offers courses throughout the year where he shares some of his knowledge with eager home cooks.

MORE INFORMATION

MulotsElbio, Newton & Norwood

Two venues to sample Elbio Luis Perez’s Latin American inspired pastry creations. The original factory outlet and café have been around for many years but the new Norwood premises in an old Baptist church is proving a real winner. Inside Elbio’s cafe lunch menu creations including empanadas, Sandwiches De Miga, tortillas, choripan, and chivitos are proving super popular.

Interestingly, much of the 145-year-old church has been restored including the pipe organ and the gorgeous interior. Elbio’s passion for n produce is highlighted throughout many of his creations with a nod to his Uruguayan heritage.

The original Newton premises are where all the magic happens in the kitchen with the ovens turning out a daily supply of handmade cakes and biscuits. Beyond Elbio’s own venues, many of the State’s cafes feature Elbio items on their menus.

MORE INFORMATION

Elbio

​This article brought to you by the South Tourism Commission

Yahoo to exit internet business and keep Alibaba stake, CNBC says

Internet search giant Yahoo may soon not run it internet business anymore. Photo: iStockYahoo Inc is weighing a sale of its core internet business and will not sell its stake in Chinese e-retailer Alibaba Group, CNBC reported, a sharp reversal that came after pressure from an activist investor.
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The moves, which CNBC said could be announced as soon as Wednesday, represent a stark rejection of chief executive Marissa Mayer’s plans to sell the Alibaba stake and revive its internet business focusing on growing mobile, video and social media ads.

Yahoo could not immediately be reached for comment.

Yahoo’s shares rose more than 2 per cent in after-hours trading. Alibaba’s shares rose 1.3 per cent.

Yahoo’s core business consists of its news sites, popular email service and products like Tumblr and its advertising technology.

The CNBC report, which cited sources, did not disclose a possible price. Analysts and bankers have estimated the unit could fetch between $US2 billion ($2.76 billion) and $US8 billion, with many seeing $US4 billion as the likely price.

Private equity, media and Internet firms are potential buyers, they said.

The latest news came after a three-day meeting of its board of directors last week. Yahoo faced pressure from activist investor Starboard Value to sell the core business rather than proceed with the planned spin-off of its $US30 billion stake in Alibaba, which could trigger large tax payments.

“This was really a really good PR move by Starboard as the spinoff was highly unlikely anyway given the tax implications and they knew they could claim victory once Yahoo made the official announcement,” said Jim Osman of The Edge Consulting Group, a research firm that advises activist hedge funds.

Yahoo’s board met last Friday on the third and final day of meetings to consider various options for the company, including selling its struggling Internet business.

The company’s search and display ad businesses, which account for the lion’s share of its total revenue, have been struggling and Mayer’s efforts to revive the businesses have yielded few results.

Reuters

Video: ‘I’ll ride with you’ – song of hope for Martin Place siege anniversary

From siege to sincerity – that’s the message behind the latest project by a St George singer whose lyrics symbolise hope and resilience.
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To mark the December 15anniversary of the Lindt Cafe Martin Place siege, in which Katrina Dawson and Tori Johnsondied, singer/songwriter ‘‘UC Brigante’’, 20, released a song dedicated to the event.

“I’ll Ride With You” was inspired by the viral hashtag of the same name, which flooded social media, as ns banded together to show their support for the Muslim population.

UC Brigante – I’ll Ride With You (Music Video) #illridewithyouJust like John Lennon’s “Give Peace a Chance” and Cat Stevens’ “Peace Train” helped a generation show unity in troubled times, UC Brigante hopes his song will helpcontinue the acts of kindness.

“I wanted to write a song that would be beneficial in spreading the message of peace, love, and kindness to uplift us when we’re down and remind us that we’re all in this together,’’ he said.

‘‘These views are in the lyrics, ‘don’t the lose the vision, with all this division…gottahave respect, gotta have trust, we all want peace, it’s up to us’.’’

UC Brigante filmed the video as he travelled by train into Sydney’s CBD.

It shows him walking through the Domain and interacting with the public near well-known Sydney landscapes.

‘‘We are going through tough times and everyone is on edge, but is a beautiful place with people of all backgrounds,’’ he said.

‘‘This is a country of mateship.’’

US Brigante has released songs, recorded in his home studio, on YouTube since he was 13.

This is not the first time he has set out to spread the message of positive change in the community.

Earlier this year he released an anti-gang song titled “The Block”, which peaked at number six on the Aussie hip-hop/rap charts on iTunes.

“We need people on all levels of society – including individuals, institutions, politicians and policy makers to be as inclusive as possible, striving to bring benefit and prevent harm and help create a safe world for everyone,’’ UC Brigante said.

‘‘Current times need more young creative talent to help build bridges between communities.’’